PETRAS

PETRAS

PETRAS is the EPSRC IoT Research Hub.

The PETRAS Internet of Things Research Hub is a consortium of nine leading UK universities which will work together to explore critical issues in privacy, ethics, trust, reliability, acceptability, and security in IoT. Funding for the Hub includes a £9.8 million grant from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) which will be boosted by partner contributions to approximately £23 million in total. This project also runs in collaboration with Digital Catapult’s IoTUK programme.

The PETRAS IoT Hub, is led by UCL and includes Imperial College LondonLancaster UniversityUniversity of OxfordUniversity of WarwickCardiff UniversityUniversity of EdinburghUniversity of Southampton, and University of Surrey.

The IoTUK programme is working with PETRAS to disseminate the work that is coming out of the programme to businesses, government and for further academic research.

You can read about the PETRAS project in this article from Rachel Cooper OBE on Living in IoT.

IoTUK Staff
sade.laja2@cde.catapult.org.uk
1 Comment
  • Rick Chandler
    Reply

    Event 25th Oct might be of interest.

    Citizen issues in policies for Internet of Things
    Oct 25th CMA Event – speaker details and timing

    Much of the discussion around the Internet of Things relating to technical and commercial aspects raises questions about the vital human side and the policies which will be needed to protect citizens. Last year BCS and IoTUK jointly commissioned a study by RAND Europe, whose report is here.
    https://www.rand.org/randeurope/research/projects/accelerating-internet-of-things-uk.html
    This study pointed strongly to the need to put citizens their rights and interests at the centre of IoT policy debates. As IoT based services are designed and deployed the people involved continue to support this conclusion and feel that more concrete actions are needed to make it a reality.
    In June CMA hosted a high-level workshop to discuss the topic. Issues included personal data and privacy, trustworthiness and trust, device behaviour, liability and market power issues.
    Information on this workshop is here: http://www.bcs.org/content/ConWebDoc/58135

    Much work is going on and we decided to run a series of meetings to take this discussion forward the first of which will be on 25th October at BCS London and I am pleased to confirm the speakers and agenda below.
    DOORS WILL OPEN AT 18:00 AND PRESENTATIONS START AT 18:30

    THIS IS A FREE EVENT WITH PLENTY OF TIME FOR DISCUSSION, FOLLOWED BY NETWORKING DRINKS AND REFRESHMENTS TILL 21:30

    PLEASE BOOK NOW.

    The booking link is https://events.bcs.org/book/2638/

    Prof Rick Chandler
    Chairman CMA

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    SPEAKERS
    Claire Milne – Freelence Telecom Policy consultant. ex-BT; also LSE VSF, active in consumer and policy circles (CFC, CSISAC, FISP), spoke at 2016 OECD Ministerial on Digital Economy. Claire Started virtual group of interested consumer representatives and policy-oriented academics, exchanging news and views and has been the prime mover in this initiative.

    Pete Eiseneger is BSI’s Consumer and Public Interest Network – Consumer Coordinator for Digital Standards. He is also an IoT and Privacy Expert for ANEC the European Consumer Voice in Standardisation, and ISO’s Consumer Policy Committee’s Key Person for Privacy and Data Protection.
    He is a member of the National Consumer Federation’s Executive Committee focusing on consumer regulation and enforcement and its economic impact when consumer needs are poorly addressed.”

    Dr. Irene Brass Has an academic background in the regulation and standardisation of emerging digital technologies, has worked as a postdoc researcher with the PETRAS IoT Standards, Governance and Policy team and is closely engaged with the UCL STEaPP group. https://www.ucl.ac.uk/steapp/people/brass
    TOPICS WHICH WE INTEND TO COVER (SUBJECT TO DISCUSSION) INCLUDE
    – What are the main policy and regulatory challenges that IoT brings?
    – Is the current regulatory landscape in the UK fit for purpose, in terms of efficiently, effectively and ethically dealing with these challenges?
    (a review of the current regulatory landscape in the UK).
    – Given some of the current regulatory gaps that we’ve identified, to what extent is the market, through domestic and/ or transnational standardisation, responding to fill in these gaps?
    -a review of the emerging security standards landscape for IoT
    – a review of the ISO Consumer Policy Committee draft standard against the GDPR
    – a review of the ISO Consumer Policy Committee draft standard with respect the UK Government’s 29 Cyber Security Principles for automated and digitally connected vehicles
    – work for ANEC on Cyber Security and consumer standards – highlighting the need for liability legislation for IoT.
    Designing for consumer goods and services to include
    – the generic approach and then 3 examples: ISO 10377 – safety by design standard, following the EU Standardization request M/473 the Design for All standard EN 17161 and the ISO COPOLCO draft PbD standard.
    – a look at two real life examples to show how the designing for consumers approach addresses real life issues, these are yet another children’s toy found woeful on security and privacy; and problems with the Government’s identity verification service VERIFY.

    Oct 18, 2017 at 7:10 pm

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